Skip to content Skip to navigation

Kenneth Goodson receives Semiconductor Research Corporation’s Technical Excellence Award

Kenneth Goodson receives Semiconductor Research Corporation’s Technical Excellence Award

The award recognizes Goodson’s work studying heat transfer in electronic nanostructures and packaging, microfluidic heat sinks, and thermoelectric and photonic energy conversion devices.
September 9, 2014

Kenneth Goodson

 

Kenneth Goodson, the Bosch Mechanical Engineering Department Chairman and Davies Family Provostial Professor, has received the Semiconductor Research Corporation’s Technical Excellence Award for his work studying heat transfer in electronic nanostructures and packaging, microfluidic heat sinks, and thermoelectric and photonic energy conversion devices. The Technical Excellence Award recognizes researchers who have made key contributions to technologies that significantly enhance the productivity of the semiconductor industry.

The Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) is a leading research consortium for semiconductors and related technologies, sponsoring university research and supporting elite students and faculty around the world. Selected by SRC’s 12 member companies and the SRC staff, award-winning faculty and research teams are recognized for their impact on semiconductor productivity through cultivation of technology and talent.

“I am warmly thankful and honored by this award,” Goodson said. “SRC has generously supported my students and our research for two decades as of this coming fall, and the member companies and SRC have displayed conspicuously great citizenship toward the academic community in general. It has been, and will continue to be, a pleasure to work with SRC and the companies.”

Goodson’s research brings fundamental science to applications in heat management and energy conversion. His lab pioneered phonon free path measurements using silicon nanolayers and has developed highly cited papers on diamond, carbon nanotubes, phase change memory and two-phase microfluidics. Fifteen of Goodson’s PhD graduates are now engineering faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, UC-Berkeley and other top schools.

SRC also honored Dimitri Antoniadis, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT with its Aristotle Award for outstanding teaching and a deep commitment to the educational experience of his students. SRC cited Antoniadis’ team at MIT for pioneering research in nanoscale solid-state electronic devices involving the application of new materials systems and structures to transistors for deeply scaled electronics.

Renowned for his research contributions to field-effect devices and silicon process modeling, Antoniadis’ present research focuses on the physics, technology and modeling of nanoscale device materials for complementary metal — oxide — semiconductor applications.

The Technical Excellence and Aristotle awards were presented Sept. 9 at TECHCON, which brings together the brightest minds in microelectronics research to exchange news about the progress of new materials and processes created by SRC’s network of more than 100 of the top engineering universities.